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TrickyDick
02-09-2016, 06:59 AM
Was reading about using a paper towel in a stand mixer grinder attachment to get the last bit of meat to come out the tube. I've also heard of using bread for the same goal. I've heard the paper towel will not easily of at all come out the plate when doing this, but the bread will, and is edible. I suspect that one could also do the same for sausage stuffers. The vertical types can retain a significant amount of sausage, probably close to a half pound for mine.
Next time I'm making sausage I'm going to give it a shot with some bread in the grinder in case some gets into the sausage, no big deal. For the stuffer I'm thinking paper towel might work better, as the bread would be easily compressed an gum things up perhaps.
Happy grinding and stuffing!

TD

Quadman750
02-09-2016, 09:18 AM
The bread sounds like a great idea, i use what's left in the bottom for burgers depending on what kind of sausage.

TentHunter
02-09-2016, 03:50 PM
I've used the bread trick for a grinder and it works pretty well.

As for a stuffer? I cannot see how either bread or paper towel would work. Neither is malleable enough to be forced into the tube.

For the sausage left in the stuffing tube: LIke Quadman, I usually just make a patty or two out of it and smoke/cook it alongside the other sausage in the smoker, like I did here: Smoked Kielbasa Time! (http://www.pelletsmoking.com/searching-cure-26/smoked-kielbasa-time-7982/)

It can be eaten on a sandwich, or cut up and put into a pot of baked beans, etc. It never goes to waste.

TrickyDick
02-09-2016, 05:12 PM
I normally do that, however, for my latest pepperoni, using Cure #2 and T-SPX cultures, I didn't want to make fresh patties to eat. I threw it out. In retrospect, I should've NOT sealed the last fibrous casing, and manually stuffed the remainder into the casing and twisted to tighten up. I guess we should assume that you will lose a softball sized piece of sausage unless it has no Cure besides plain salt/sugar/spices and no Nitrate/Nitrite or cultures.

TD

Quadman750
02-09-2016, 05:19 PM
Do you have a jerky gun, might work for the last little bit.

TentHunter
02-09-2016, 05:38 PM
I normally do that, however, for my latest pepperoni, using Cure #2 and T-SPX cultures, I didn't want to make fresh patties to eat. I threw it out. In retrospect, I should've NOT sealed the last fibrous casing, and manually stuffed the remainder into the casing and twisted to tighten up. I guess we should assume that you will lose a softball sized piece of sausage unless it has no Cure besides plain salt/sugar/spices and no Nitrate/Nitrite or cultures.

TD


Yeah I can see why for a dry-cure sausage you wouldn't make patties. Makes sense.

I have, for larger casings, manually stuffed the rest of the sausage using the stuffer tube detached from the stuffer. It's just a bit of a pain and you tend to get air pockets, but it does work. For smaller casings it's REALLY a pain and not worth the time.

hariandro001
03-13-2017, 11:27 PM
I grind, mix, taste, adjust seasoning and then stuff.

I'm sure there are good reasons for doing it both ways but this is how I found I prefer to do it. Do you have a separate sausage stuffer or will you have to feed the ground sausage back into your grinder to stuff?

Chef Anjana
06-03-2017, 04:31 AM
If you have your own grinder, buy pork shoulder roasts, sometimes called "Boston blade roasts," or else use so-called country-style spare ribs, which are merely pork shoulder cut into strips: they are boneless and ready to grind. The shoulder roasts have only about 10% bone by weight. The bone, part of the scapula, is easy to remove with a boning knife.