1 Star - Drip pan & turkey?
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1 Star - Drip pan & turkey?
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Thread: 1 Star - Drip pan & turkey?

  1. #1

    Question 1 Star - Drip pan & turkey?

    I have a couple questions regarding the 1 Star and drip pan.

    1. There isn't a lot of space between the grill grate and the deflector plate, too narrow for most drip pans I see. If I'm doing a 13-14 pound turkey suggestions?
    2. I have the upper grate, will the bird fit there without lid clearance issues?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    My first advice is to spatchcock that bird! The bird cooks in just a little over half the time, without drying out. That's how we do ours every year now, because it works beautifully. I learned about spatchocking from members on this forum about seven years ago. There is no need to brine using this method.

    What we normally do is to cut out the back bone and splay it open for the cook (That's spatchcocking), remove the red plastic button & throw it away. Stick a meat probe in it and cook it at 325 - 350 until an Internal Temperature of 165 in the thickest part of the breast. The legs, because they're not as thick, will get to around 175 which is perfect for the dark meat.

    Count on about 10 - 12 minutes per lb using this method for cooking time (depending on your actual cooking temp).

    You can use the backbone, along with the neck and/or giblets, to make stock for the stuffing/dressing (and gravy), and cook the stuffing in a separate pan.


    In answer to your question about the drip pan:

    On the 1 Star you have PLENTY of room on the upper grate (whole or spatchcocked) and have a drip pan underneath on the bottom if you wish.

    Alternatively, we often times just put the pan of stuffing on the bottom rack under the turkey to catch some of the juices (about half-way through the cook).


    The danger of spatchcocking is that once you try the method you may also become hooked!
    Last edited by TentHunter; 11-12-2017 at 04:33 PM.
    <><
    MAK 1 Star General #651 - 2014 Model
    former owner - MAK 1 Star General #171
    22.5" Weber Performer with Stoven Pellet Grill attachment
    27 + year old 22.5" Weber Kettle (still works fine)
    Modified Horizontal Offset Smoker - used mainly for cold smoking.

  3. #3
    Like Cliff said.....Spatchcocking is the way to go! Whole bird turns out juicy every time. I still brine mine but that's just a personal preference. After I did my first bird this way. I never went back. It just turns out good every time!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by wolverines View Post
    Like Cliff said.....Spatchcocking is the way to go! Whole bird turns out juicy every time. I still brine mine but that's just a personal preference. After I did my first bird this way. I never went back. It just turns out good every time!
    So, do you brine and then spatchcock or spatchcock and then brine?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BBQJUDGE View Post
    So, do you brine and then spatchcock or spatchcock and then brine?
    You can brine before or after you cut out the backbone if you like; it doesn't matter.

    If you're brining for flavor (i.e. adding hard cider, something like that), then brining is great. If you're brining for the purpose of keeping the turkey juicy, then as I mentioned above, it's really not needed. In fact, it's almost wasted on this method.



    Quote Originally Posted by wolverines
    After I did my first bird this way. I never went back.
    Same here! It's how we cook all our poultry now, chickens, ducks... Once you spatchcock, it's hard to go back!
    <><
    MAK 1 Star General #651 - 2014 Model
    former owner - MAK 1 Star General #171
    22.5" Weber Performer with Stoven Pellet Grill attachment
    27 + year old 22.5" Weber Kettle (still works fine)
    Modified Horizontal Offset Smoker - used mainly for cold smoking.

  6. #6
    Thanks Tent! So no brine. What do you put on your bird?

  7. #7
    Administrator Big Poppa's Avatar
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    Ok I will hop in here please check the Big Poppa Thanksgiving tips and tricks in the recipes section...I have been dry brining with just a little little louies rub sealt is just fine too Check out serious eats for their turkey dry brine

  8. #8
    First, I usually rub a SMALL amount of salt under the skin: about 1/4 tsp per breast side and per thigh (so about 1 tsp total). Then I apply about another tsp or so all over the outside (skin and cavity sides). I like to do this after I spatchcock the bird, about an hour or so before I put the turkey on. You could do this the night before if you prefer, then it would act sort of like a dry brine (but nowhere near the amount of salt).


    For the outside, I mix up a dried herb rub:
    This is enough for a 12 - 15 lb turkey

    Adjust for your turkey size and preference:
    -2 TBS rubbed sage
    -1 tsp dried crushed Rosemary
    -1 tsp dried Thyme
    -1/2 tsp course black pepper

    I usually apply a thin coat of mayo over the skin first and then apply the rub to both the skin and underside (carcass side).







    Again, brining is a preference. If you have a brine you really like, use it! About the only time I brine turkey is if I'm doing Carnival-Style Smoked Turkey Legs (the kind you get at fairs, etc.), in which case I use a ham brine to cure them. But that's because I'm after a ham-like texture & flavor.
    <><
    MAK 1 Star General #651 - 2014 Model
    former owner - MAK 1 Star General #171
    22.5" Weber Performer with Stoven Pellet Grill attachment
    27 + year old 22.5" Weber Kettle (still works fine)
    Modified Horizontal Offset Smoker - used mainly for cold smoking.

  9. #9
    Thanks Tent and BP!

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