Upper grate or griddle
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Thread: Upper grate or griddle

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Taeter View Post
    Looks like the vote is 5 to 0 for the upper rack and I am hearing ya.
    Full grate is ordered plus a brush and Meatheads The Science of Great BBQ and Grilling. Being a newbie I figure I should get some basics down before turning a brisket into dog food.
    Used all my points and then some.

    Thanks all for the input. Especially the info on the temp differential between the upper rack and the pellet boss readout.
    I presume you have the 2019 model with the roaming Thermocouple, meaning you can place the TC close to what you are cooking. So, if you use the upper rack for cooking, and place pan or foil on the main as RWALTERS suggests, you can place the TC on the upper. The pellet Boss is then measuring the temp at the upper rack and the temperature differential goes away! Well, rather the pellet Boss will read the temp at the upper and work to maintain it. So, placing the TC on the upper, set to 225 or 250, and that is what the cooking temp will be (on average since the Pellet Boss uses an averaging algorithm).

    Hope that is no too confusing. I use this method almost all the time - pork butt, ribs, brisket, etc. all on the upper with pan/foil below. This also makes it easy to drop anything that you want "wrapped" into that pan and cover it. Very useful for wrapping to get through the "stall" on various cooks.
    --Sam

    MAK 2 Star #3634
    Weber Summit E450 gasser
    Blackstone 17" griddle

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Roseville CA
    Posts
    205
    Quote Originally Posted by sschorr View Post
    I presume you have the 2019 model with the roaming Thermocouple, meaning you can place the TC close to what you are cooking. So, if you use the upper rack for cooking, and place pan or foil on the main as RWALTERS suggests, you can place the TC on the upper. The pellet Boss is then measuring the temp at the upper rack and the temperature differential goes away! Well, rather the pellet Boss will read the temp at the upper and work to maintain it. So, placing the TC on the upper, set to 225 or 250, and that is what the cooking temp will be (on average since the Pellet Boss uses an averaging algorithm).

    Hope that is no too confusing. I use this method almost all the time - pork butt, ribs, brisket, etc. all on the upper with pan/foil below. This also makes it easy to drop anything that you want "wrapped" into that pan and cover it. Very useful for wrapping to get through the "stall" on various cooks.
    Totally off topic... but I see you have a Weber Summit. Knowing how well the MAK’s grill, just curious to know how often you use it and for what types of cooks?
    MAK 2 Star -- 26.75" Weber kettle -- Camp Chef FTG900

    I am not a vegetarian, but I eat animals that are...

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by rwalters View Post
    Totally off topic... but I see you have a Weber Summit. Knowing how well the MAKs grill, just curious to know how often you use it and for what types of cooks?
    Totally off reply.... I actually use the Weber quite often for grilling and griddling. I have Grill Grates on the Weber. So, SWMBO does not like smoked foods. She will eat some pulled pork, and bacon, but that's about it. Burgers, fish, chicken, steaks, fajitas, veggies are almost always done on the Weber using either the flat side or grill side of the GGs.

    I smoke 2-3 times a month on the MAK, either when we have guests or I just want some dang, good smoked food. For example, I really love smoked meatloaf, pulled pork, brisket, Tri-tip, so I will smoke that up (and reverse sear the Tri-tip on the gasser 'cause its right there, gets to very hot in 10 minutes, sear for 5 mins and done) for myself. I smoke my ribs (of all kinds) on the MAK, but make hers in the oven. I'll make chicken drums or wings on the MAK for me and cook hers on the Weber. Half or whole chicken (spatchcock) on the Weber 'cause she won't eat chicken that is smoked.

    Bottom line for me is that the Weber gets really, really hot (up to 700-800) on the GGs in 10 minutes, so it is my go-to for reverse searing and grilling.

    You may ask "why did you have a smoker at all?" - 'cause southern Orange County does not have any good BBQ joints, and the ribs or brisket or pulled pork that most restaurants serve around here is pretty bad IMHO. Plus I love the whole process of cooking, and smoking my own foods is such a good thing in Life.
    --Sam

    MAK 2 Star #3634
    Weber Summit E450 gasser
    Blackstone 17" griddle

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Roseville CA
    Posts
    205
    Makes perfect sense for your situation! I have a gasser, but mine happens to be a 48” Camp Chef griddle that I absolutely LOVE!! Use it all the time
    MAK 2 Star -- 26.75" Weber kettle -- Camp Chef FTG900

    I am not a vegetarian, but I eat animals that are...

  5. #15
    Thanks for the reminder on moving the tc sschorr. Right now I’m on the bottom end of the learning curve. No place to go but up.
    Did a pork roast and put a pan under it while cooking to keep the grill clean. Saw that on a utube vid. Also saw where people put a bowl of liquid in the pit to add moisture. So I put some apple juice in the pan and then put foil formed to the pan above the apple juice.seemed to work good. Juice evaporated and the foil caught the grease.
    Did you say that you would put the meat in the greasy foil? I understand why you would foil the meat but that foil was lookin kinda gross.
    Btw the pork turned out pretty good. The wife had 2 sandwiches and she’s not a big pork fan.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Taeter View Post
    Thanks for the reminder on moving the tc sschorr. Right now Im on the bottom end of the learning curve. No place to go but up.
    Did a pork roast and put a pan under it while cooking to keep the grill clean. Saw that on a utube vid. Also saw where people put a bowl of liquid in the pit to add moisture. So I put some apple juice in the pan and then put foil formed to the pan above the apple juice.seemed to work good. Juice evaporated and the foil caught the grease.
    Did you say that you would put the meat in the greasy foil? I understand why you would foil the meat but that foil was lookin kinda gross.
    Btw the pork turned out pretty good. The wife had 2 sandwiches and shes not a big pork fan.
    Taeter - for a pork butt, I would definitely put it into the pan with the drippings in the case of choosing to wrap the butt. This usually happens if the butt has hit the "stall" (at about 160*-180*) and I want to wrap it to finish. Drop in the pan and tightly cover with foil. After the butt hits finish temp and rested, I would pull into a fresh pan, leaving the fatty chunks and stuff behind. Pour juices into something to separate fat from juice, and save the juice for using reheated PP. Very tasty stuff in that juice!
    --Sam

    MAK 2 Star #3634
    Weber Summit E450 gasser
    Blackstone 17" griddle

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Taeter View Post
    Also saw where people put a bowl of liquid in the pit to add moisture. So I put some apple juice in the pan and then put foil formed to the pan above the apple juice.seemed to work good. Juice evaporated and the foil caught the grease.
    People sometimes talk about adding a water pan as if it's something you should either always do, or never do. A little bit of common sense is needed here because it greatly depends on where you live and/or the time of year. Adding a pan of water is helpful if you live in an area that is arid, or it's a time of year when the air is dry (Winter).

    For instance here in NE Ohio, during the colder weather months the air gets VERY dry. That is when I notice a pan (or a couple cans) of water helps. During the warm months, when it gets humid, a water pan has little effect.

    The smoke ring can be a good indicator of this, because moisture is needed in order for the nitric acid to form on the surface of the meat (from the nitric oxide release when wood combusts). Moisture is also needed for the smoke particulates (syringol & guaiacol) to effectively move into the meat.


    For the water pan, just add water when needed (apple juice or anything else doesn't really add anything). I usually add hot water because it can start adding moisture immediately. Cold water has to heat up first.

    A little apple juice, beer, etc. is fine to add with the meat as a braising liquid when you foil the pork.


    Hope this makes sense and helps!
    <><
    MAK 1 Star General #651 - 2014 Model
    former owner - MAK 1 Star General #171
    22.5" Weber Performer with Stoven Pellet Grill attachment
    27 + year old 22.5" Weber Kettle (still works fine)
    Modified Horizontal Offset Smoker - used mainly for cold smoking.

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